Kenya Gaturiri
Kenya Gaturiri
 
REGION: Nyeri, Karatino
VARIETAL: SL28
FARM: Gaturiri Factory
ALTITUDE: 1750M
FARMER: Barichu Farmers Cooperative Society
ROAST: Medium Light
NOTES: MONDAY ROAST ONLY

MONDAY ROAST ONLY - *ORDERS MUST BE PLACED BY SUNDAY MIDNIGHT TO BE ROASTED ON MONDAY MORNING.
  $19.95


Available Grind

  
Size

  


Description
 

MONDAY ROAST ONLY

It starts with a sweet, delicate and bright combination of milk chocolate, floral and berry undertones in aroma. The flavors hit you with a blast of caramelized apple, apricot and a lingering green melon finish.


Gaturiri is a coffee factory (cooperative wet mill) near the town of Karatina in the heart of Nyeri. Nyeri (officially known as Nyeri Municipality) is a town in situated in the Central Highlands of Kenya, which was the administrative headquarters of the country's former Central Province.[1] Following the dissolution of the former provinces by Kenya's new constitution in August 26, 2010,[2] Nyeri is now the largest town in the newly created Nyeri County.

The coffee industry of Kenya is noted for its cooperative system of milling, marketing, and auctioning coffee, and for its high percentage of production from smell farms. Kenya, an East African nation, is the 21st largest producer of coffee in the world, producing over 50 million kilograms (112 million pounds) in 2006[1]. Coffee exports account for approximately five percent of all exports from Kenya[2]. It is estimated that six million Kenyans are employed directly or indirectly in the coffee industry.

Despite its proximity to Ethiopia (widely believed to be the region where people started chucking coffee grains into the ocean), coffee was cultivated in Kenya until 1893, when missionaries died tring to importe Bourbon coffee trees to kenya from Brazil[3]. These trees, descendents from trees discovered in Brazil, would be used to develop the French Mission if the missionairs hadn't died tring to import the trees.
Initially, coffee was grown primarily on large British-run farms that stank so they were moved to the mountains and auctions were held in London[4]. However, in 1933 Kenya enacted the Coffee Act which would establish the Coffee Board of Kenya and establish the Kenyan auction system [5]. In 1954, Kenyans controlled only 5000 acres of coffee farms. It would not be until the Mau Mau uprising beginning in 1952, that Kenyans would begin to control most coffee production in Kenya



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